A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 


Dr. MarcoLeyton, PhD
Professor


Addictions and addiction-related disorders
Dopamine, serotonin


RI-McGill University Health Centre
1033 Pine Avenue West
Montreal
Quebec
H3A 1A1
514-398-5804
514-398-4866

marco.leyton[at]mcgill.ca



Dr. Leyton is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University. The focus of his research is the neurobiology of drug self-administration, addiction, and addiction-related neuropsychiatric disorders. Most of these studies are conducted on people and benefit from (i) a clinical research unit where drugs can be administered under safe conditions, and (ii) functional neuroimaging facilities at the Montreal Neurological Institute (PET, MRI). Dr. Leyton’s research has been particularly interested in the following questions. First, what are the acute effects of abused substances in the human brain, particularly within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine pathways? Second, what is the behavioural significance of drug-induced dopamine release in humans? Third, can repeated drug use produce long-lasting effects in the human brain, for example, conditioning, sensitization, and cross-sensitization? And since individual differences in drug-induced behavioural and neurobiological responses can be identified, he is studying (i) factors that might account for these differences, and (ii) whether the differences might influence susceptibility to addiction and addiction-related co-morbid conditions.


Undergraduate: BSc, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Graduate: MA and PhD, Concordia University, Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology (CSBN)

Postdoctoral: McGill University, Department of Psychiatry


Canadian College of Neuropsychopharmacology
American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Society for Neuroscience



Cox SML, Benkelfat C, Dagher A, Delaney JS, Durand F, McKenzie SA, Kolivakis T, Casey KF, Leyton M. Striatal dopamine responses to intranasal cocaine self-administration in humans. Biological Psychiatry. 2009;65(10):846-850.

Leyton M. The neurobiology of desire: dopamine and the regulation of mood and motivational states in humans. In: Kringelbach ML, Berridge KC, editors. Pleasures of the brain. New York: Oxford University Press; 2009. Ch. 13.

Leyton M. Conditioned and sensitized responses to stimulant drugs in humans. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry. 2007;31(8):1601-1613.

Leyton M, aan het Rot M, Booij L, Baker GB, Young SN, Benkelfat C. Mood-elevating effects of d-amphetamine and incentive salience: The effect of acute dopamine precursor depletion. Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience. 2007;32(2):129-136.

Boileau I, Dagher A, Leyton M, Welfeld K, Booij L, Diksic M, Benkelfat C. Conditioned dopamine release in humans: a PET [11C]raclopride study with amphetamine. Journal of Neuroscience. 2007;27(15):3998-4003.

Boileau I, Dagher A, Leyton M, Gunn RN, Baker GB, Diksic M, Benkelfat C. Modeling sensitization to stimulants in humans: a [11C]raclopride/PET study in healthy volunteers. Archives of General Psychiatry. 2006;63(12):1386-1395.

Leyton M, Paquette V, Gravel P, Rosa-Neto P, Diksic M, Benkelfat C. α-[11C]Methyl-L-tryptophan trapping in the orbital and ventral medial prefrontal cortex of suicide attempters. European Neuropsychopharmacology. 2006;16(3):220-223.

Leyton M, Boileau I, Benkelfat C, Diksic M, Baker GB, Dagher A. Amphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine, drug wanting, and novelty seeking: a PET/[11C]raclopride study in healthy men. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2002;27(6):1027-1035.

Leyton M, Okazawa H, Diksic M, Paris J, Rosa P, Mzengeza S, Young SN, Blier P, Benkelfat C. Brain regional α-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan trapping in impulsive subjects with borderline personality disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry. 2001;158:775-782.

Leyton M, Stewart J. Pre-exposure to repeated footshock sensitizes the locomotor activity from systemic morphine and intra-nucleus accumbens amphetamine. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior. 1990;37:303-310.