A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 


Dr. FlorianStorch, PhD
Assistant Professor


Circadian rhythms
Mouse genetics


Douglas Mental Health University Institute
6875 LaSalle Blvd
Montreal
Quebec
H4H 1R3
514-761-6131 ext. 6152
514-762-3034

florian.storch@mcgill.ca



Dr. Storch joined the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in June 2008 after completing his postdoctoral studies at Harvard Medical School, where he explored the biological role of circadian clocks, internal timers that generate rhythms with a period of 24 hours. His research contributed to the current understanding that the circadian timing system in mammals is made up of a multitude of intrinsic clocks that are distributed throughout the body, including the brain. Dr. Storch showed that these clocks typically control more than 10% of the genes expressed in a given tissue, suggesting that many biological processes must be clock-regulated. Dr. Storch’s research program aims to elucidate the functional significance of this multi-oscillator timing system by employing genetic mouse models. He will examine mice that lack circadian clock function in selected tissues or organs for deficits in physiology and behaviour. It is believed that circadian clocks in the central nervous system play important roles in the control of various brain functions, including the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, locomotion, body weight, reproduction, and reward processing. Dr. Storch plans to rigorously examine these links by genetically manipulating clock function in selected brain structures. Dr. Storch’s research may yield fundamental insights into how our internal 24-hour timers affect the nervous system and may thus pave the way for new concepts to tackle mental disorders and other brain dysfunctions.


Undergraduate: Diploma, University of Munich
Graduate: PhD, University of Munich

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Harvard Medical School





Storch KF, Weitz CJ. Daily rhythms of food anticipatory behavioral activity do not require the known circadian clock. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2009;106:6808-13.

Lamia KA, Storch KF, Weitz CJ. Physiological significance of a peripheral tissue circadian clock. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2008;105:15172-7.

Storch KF, Paz C, Signorovitch J, Raviola E, Pawlyk B, Li T, Weitz CJ. Physiological importance of a circadian clock outside the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol. 2007;72:307-18.

Storch KF, Paz C, Signorovitch J, Raviola E, Pawlyk B, Li T, Weitz CJ. Circadian clock in the mammalian retina: importance for retinal responses to light. Cell. 2007;130:730-4.

Zhong S, Storch KF, Lipan O, Kao MC, Weitz CJ, Wong WH. GoSurfer: a graphical interactive tool for comparative analysis of large gene sets in Gene Ontology space. Appl Bioinformatics. 2004;3:261-264.

Storch KF, Lipan O, Leykin I, Viswanathan N, Davis FC, Wong WH, Weitz CJ. Extensive and divergent circadian gene expression in liver and heart. Nature. 2002;417:78-83.