A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 


Dr. SimonN.Young, PhD
Professor


Behavioural neurochemistry



Ludmer Research and Training Building
1033 Pine Avenue West
Montreal
Montreal
H3A 1A1
514-398-7317
514-398-4370

simon.young@mcgill.ca



Dr. Young came to Canada in 1971 to do a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University. He remained there and is now a professor. The main focus of his research has been on the biogenic amines and in particular on serotonin. Over the years, his research has ranged from metabolic studies of biogenic amine synthesis in animals to the effect of diet on brain biogenic amines, the association between measures related to biogenic amines and symptoms or psychopathology, and studies on how decreasing or increasing biogenic amines alters mood and social behaviour in humans. His is known as one of the pioneers of the amino acid depletion technique used to investigate the effects of lowered biogenic amine synthesis in humans. A secondary interest is in some of the factors that influence memory and state in human newborn infants. Most of his work is collaborative, and he has worked with psychiatrists, neurologists, pediatricians, and psychologists. Dr. Young has been active in several areas outside of research. At McGill he has been active on tenure committees and research ethics boards and nationally on various grant committees. He spent more than a decade on the executive of the Canadian College of Neuropsychopharmacology, filling various positions, including treasurer and president. He joined the founding editorial board of the Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience in 1990 and has been co-editor-in-chief since 2000. He is a strong supporter of open access publishing and is pleased that the journal is the open access journal with the highest impact factor in the Journal Citation Reports lists of both psychiatry and neuroscience journals.


Undergraduate: BA in chemistry, Oxford University
Graduate: PhD in biochemistry, London, England

Postdoctoral Fellow: Department of Psychiatry, McGill University





Botez MI, Young SN, Bachevalier J, Gauthier S. Folate deficiency and decreased brain 5-hydroxytryptamine synthesis in man and rat. Nature. 1979;278:182-183.

Morand C, Young SN, Ervin FR. Clinical response of aggressive schizophrenics to oral tryptophan. Biol Psychiatr. 1983;18:575-578.

Young SN, Smith SE, Pihl RO, Ervin FR. Tryptophan depletion causes a rapid lowering of mood in normal males. Psychopharmacology. 1985;87:173-177.

Abbott FV, Etienne P, Franklin KBJ, Morgan MJ, Sewitch MJ, Young SN. Acute tryptophan depletion blocks morphine analgesia in the cold-pressor test in humans. Psychopharmacology. 1992;108:60-66.

Benkelfat C, Ellenbogen M, Dean P, Palmour RM, Young SN. Mood-lowering effect of tryptophan depletion: enhanced susceptibility in young men at genetic risk for major affective disorders. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:687-697.

Pihl RO, Young SN, Harden P, Plotnick S, Chamberlain B, Ervin FR. Acute effect of altered tryptophan levels and alcohol on aggression in normal human males. Psychopharmacology. 1995;119:353-360.

Steinberg S, Annable L, Young SN, Liyanage N. A placebo-controlled clinical trial of L-tryptophan in premenstrual dysphoria. Biol Psychiatry. 1999;45:313-320.

Gormally S, Barr RG, Wertheim L, Alkawaf R, Calinoiu N, Young SN. Contact and nutrient caregiving effects on newborn infant pain responses. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2001;43:28-38.

Horne P, Barr RG, Valiante G, Zelazo PR, Young SN. Glucose enhances newborn memory for spoken words. Dev Psychobiology. 2006;48:574-582.

aan het Rot M, Moskowitz DS, Pinard G, Young SN. Social behavior and mood in everyday life: the effects of tryptophan in quarrelsome individuals. J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2006;31:253-262.